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SWT FOUNDER SIMON CLINTON TALKS TIGERS WITH BBC WORLD NEWS
 
<<< VIEW THE FULL INTERVIEW ON THE LEFT
 

Save Wild Tigers founder Simon Clinton talked to BBC World News on 15 April 2016 about the pros and cons of translocating wild tigers to former tiger range countries. Will plans to introduce Bengal tigers from India into Cambodia and Amur tigers from the Russian far east into Kazakhstan be successful?  Simon discusses tiger conservation priorities and contemplates the best use of precious resources.

The BBC story followed the conclusion of the 3rd Asian Ministerial Conference on Tigers in New Delhi (12-14 April 2016), where Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi declared that "conservation of the tiger is not a choice, it is an imperative."

Following the conference, Save Wild Tigers, along with 22 other non-governmental organisations, signed a post-meeting statement urging top level action from governments, to:

  • Prohibit legal domestic trade in tiger parts and derivatives from captive facilities among all consumer countries;
  • end tiger breeding for commercial purposes and phase out tiger farms;
  • destroy stockpiles of tiger parts and derivatives;
  • strengthen enforcement efforts and international cooperation to effectively combat tiger poaching and trade; and
  • secure tiger habitat and prevent habitat fragmentation.

Read the full post-conference statement here.

 
 

INCREASE IN GLOBAL WILD TIGER NUMBERS

For the first time in recent history, the estimated number of tigers in the wild has increased, giving hope to conservationists across the globe. The global wild tiger population has been steadily declining from 150,000 in 1900 due to poaching, habitat loss and development across tiger-range countries. In 2010, the global wild tiger estimate was reported at an all-time low of 3,200. There are now an estimated 3,890 wild tigers across 12 countries from Russia to Indonesia.

This positive news comes as the 3rd Asian Ministerial Conference on Tiger Conservation convenes in New Delhi today. The increase may be largely attributed to committed efforts since the Global Tiger Summit in 2010 by governments in India, Russia, Nepal, and Bhutan.

Overall, however, the status of wild Tigers is still CRITCAL. Whilst wild tiger populations in India are on the rise, numbers are dwindling to below 10 in China, Vietnam, and Lao PDR, and the situation in Malaysian and Indonesia is acute. Just last week Cambodia declared that its tiger population is now functionally extinct.  

The new estimate must be accepted with caution as many of the numbers are statistical means or estimates based on the best available knowledge. Actual populations, both today and in 2010, may be higher or lower and some of the increase may be attributed to improved survey methods.

Nevertheless, the upward trend is an inspiring step toward the 2022 goal of increasing global wild tiger numbers to more than 6,000. Currently the biggest threat to wild tigers is poaching to fuel demand for tiger products, parts, and derivatives. If the governments of tiger range countries will adopt a commitment to zero poaching in New Delhi this week, as called for by Save Wild Tigers along with 22 other NGOs, wild tiger populations will have a real chance of fighting back. 

 

 
TIGER COALITION DEMANDS COMMITMENT TO END TIGER TRADE 

The 3rd Asian Ministerial Conference on Tigers will be held April 12-14 in New Delhi.


Save Wild Tigers joins a coalition of 23 Tiger NGOs urging Ministers to make a commitment at this meeting to Zero Demand for tiger parts in order to achieve Zero Poaching.
While conservation successes are happening in tiger range countires that have strong laws and that value tigers for their role in the ecosystem, URGENT ACTION IS REQUIRED to end tiger farming and all domestic and international trade in parts and derivatives from tigers. 
To read our joint statement, please click here